Archive for the ‘Roman History’ Category

Hadrian’s Wall

Posted: February 21, 2018 in History, Roman History
Tags: ,

The Romans in Britain

Posted: February 8, 2018 in History, Roman History, UK
Tags:

DSCN7817-2

Neville Place is a large house in the middle of Peterborough not far from the Cathedral. The original Tudor House was built in 1536 on this site by Humphrey Orme, a courtier of Henry VIII. In 1816 the Orme family sold it to Thomas Coke, a merchant, and in 1856 it became the home of Peterborough Infirmary, being enlarged in 1897 and again in 1902. In 1928 the infirmary moved away and it became a Museum.

It is still a museum today and has displays on various aspects of local history.

The house and it’s different uses

The history of Peterborough

A wonderful collection of craft items made by internees at Norman Cross Camp. The prisoners made these from wood and animal bone and sold them to the locals to make money to spend in the prison stores.

Norman Cross was a prisoner of war camp during the Napoleonic war. Prior to its construction prisoners had been held on old ships (Prison Hulks) and conditions were not good. So the government set out to improve things by building prisoner camps on land. Initially, the plan worked well and the conditions were far better than on a hulk. However, as the war drew on and the number of prisoners increased the conditions got worse and over a thousand prisoners were killed by an outbreak of Typhus in 1800. It is recorded that in the years of its operation (1796-1816) 1770 prisoners died, although some argue that many deaths were not recorded. It was demolished in 1816 and only the governers House remains standing.

Reconstructions of Peterborough houses through the ages

The short course I did through Southampton University is still available through FutureLearn

 

or at:

https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/portus

Visualising Portus

Posted: September 5, 2017 in History, Roman History
Tags: ,

Here are a couple of videos on the visualisation project

 

A couple of years back I had the opportunity to do a short course run by the University of Southampton on the Roman Port at Portus. Since then a number of CGI impressions of the port have been produced giving us the opportunity to see what it would have looked like. This is an introductory video about the site with Professor Keay, who was the tutor on the course.

 

My previous blogs on Portus can be found at:

https://petesfavouritethings.blog/2015/05/24/portus-gateway-to-rome-1/

https://petesfavouritethings.blog/2015/05/25/portus-gateway-to-rome-2/

https://petesfavouritethings.blog/2015/05/31/portus-gateway-to-rome-3/

https://petesfavouritethings.blog/2015/06/02/portus-gateway-to-rome-4/

https://petesfavouritethings.blog/2015/06/07/portus-gateway-to-rome-5/

https://petesfavouritethings.blog/2015/06/12/portus-gateway-to-rome-6/

https://petesfavouritethings.blog/2015/06/19/portus-the-torlonia-relief/

Her is another digital reconstruction showing how Hadrian’s villa would have looked

Video by Matthew Brennan and made available through Youtube.

A couple of weeks ago I posted a link to a tour through a virtual reconstruction of Rome of 320AD. Here is another video which looks at the remains of the Forum as they are today and what they were like when they were built.

Video by Jane Eyre and made available through You-tube

 

I recently visited an exhibition on the ‘Archaeology of Crossrail’. Crossrail is the building of a new railway line in London which goes from the east to the west through central London. It will be known as the Elizabeth line when it is completed and opens in 2018-9. During the construction of the line, a number of archaeological sites have been excavated by the full-time archaeology team attached to the project. This exhibition shows some of the finds.

Mammoth Tusk

Mesolithic Flints

Roman writing Stylii

Bone ice-skate. records as early as 12th-century record people strapping pieces of bone to shoes and skating on frozen marshland. Found at Moorfield Marsh.

Tombstone from New Churchyard (1570-1740). 1665 was the year of the great plague in London. Testing remains from this cemetery has revealed the first identification of the 1665 plague pathogen enabling scientists to formally link it to the Bubonic plague of the 14th century, known as the Black Death.

Food manufacturers Crosse and Blackwell were founded in 1830 and moved to a site near Charing Cross Road in 1838. Archaeologists found over 13000 pieces of ceramics on this site.

 

 

Bison bone – dating reveals it to be 68000 years old.

 

 

The earth removed from the tunnels has been used to create a new RSPB nature reserve in Essex at Wallasea Marsh.

 

The exhibition runs until September 2017 at the Museum of London Docklands, West India Quay.