Mute Swan

Posted: March 26, 2021 in Birds, Natural History
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photo by Sue

photo by Sue

photo by Sue

photo by Sue

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I have lived just down the A20 from Crittalls Corner for 21 years and wondered where the name came from? In the other direction we have Clifton’s roundabout, which was named after a garage that used to stand on the side of the roundabout. The garage is still there, but no longer called Clifton’s. A little further away is the Yorkshire Grey roundabout, named after a pub which occupied the south side. Again, the building is still there although these days it is a McDonalds restaurant. But I didn’t know anything about Crittall’s until quite by chance I came across this in a blog post.

Francis Berrington Crittall started his eponymous company in 1849, but it wasn’t until 1884 they started making their famous metal windows which even found their way onto the Titanic. The company has always been based around Braintree in Essex, so it is a bit of a mystery why a roundabout on the A20 near Sidcup where one of their factories stood on its north-west corner should have been given the accolade of Crittalls Corner.

I copied the text but sadly the browser closed before I could get the details of the blog, so a thank you anyway to the person who blogged it. great to finally know after all these years.

Canada Goose

Posted: March 11, 2021 in Birds, Natural History
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The Canada Goose is one of our common resident geese, Introduced from North America from the late 17th century it has spread across almost the whole of the UK and is often found on city lakes and in parks as well as in the countryside.

It is estimated that there are around 62,000 breeding pairs in the UK with a peak population of around 190,000 birds.

Flock of Canada Geese with a single Greylag Goose (centre)

Bulfinch

Posted: March 4, 2021 in Birds, Natural History
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One of my favourite birds but rare in my area now.

A new visitor to the Garden

Posted: February 25, 2021 in Birds, London, Natural History, UK
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Was surprised to find a Fieldfare in the garden the other day. This was the first record since we arrived here in 2000 and took the garden list to 46 species. I didn’t manage to photograph it but here are some pictures of Fieldfare taken at Bough Beech earlier in the year

I remember seeing my first Ring-billed Gull. It was the long-staying one at Copperhouse Creek in West Cornwall. Years later we had one that returned to Greenwich/Isle of Dogs in London. Like the Copperhouse bird, it returned to the site for a number of years running.

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Snow

Posted: February 9, 2021 in Landscape, Natural History
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It was pretty wet over the weekend, but I did manage to find a break in the weather to do my garden birdwatch and recorded 11 species in the hour (plus 3 more flying over which don’t count towards the birdwatch. The flock of Redwing and the Nuthatch stayed away but most of the regulars put in an appearance

Big Garden Birdwatch

Posted: January 29, 2021 in Birds, Natural History
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Here in the UK, it’s the weekend of the Big Garden Birdwatch organised by the RSPB. This is the largest citizen science project in this country and last year almost 500,000 people took part and this year with many more of us at home in lockdown they expect the response to break that half a million observer barrier.

I have three local spots to record – My own garden, my local park and the gardens of a nearby historic house. I hope to get these done over the weekend but typically all plans have been put on hold as we have heavy rain here in London at the moment and even the birds in my garden have disappeared. Let’s hope it clears up so the results can flow in.

The survey which has now been running since 1979 has been important in tracking the rises and falls in ‘common birds’ found in gardens. It has plotted the declines in House Sparrows, Blackbirds, Robins and song Thrushes and has highlighted areas where more in detail studies should be undertaken.

Robin

So I am poised and ready for this years count. If only the rain would stop!

Some pictures from my walk around the Tarn this morning