Archive for the ‘Sussex’ Category

 

Named Norweigan, this locomotive arrived at KESR from Oslo in 1971. It was built in Trollhattan in 1919 and first saw service in the SE of the country. From there it transferred to the Nordland line, 60 miles north of Trondheim, where it served as the power unit for a snow plough. On withdrawal, it was purchased and brought to the UK. In 1984 it was purchased by the Norweigan Locomotive trust as one of only 3 surviving examples of this class and was renamed Norweigan.

 

Bodiam Castle

Posted: August 22, 2017 in History, Medieval History, Sussex, UK
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Bodiam Castle was built in 1385 as a protection against French invasion during the 100 years war. It is unusual in design as it has no central keep. Despite its initial purpose, Bodiam managed to survive without being involved in any military action. It was surrendered by the Lewkner family in 1483 when threatened with siege by forces supporting the House of York. It was returned to them following the accession of Henry VII. During the civil war, it was sold by Lord Thanet, a Royalist, to pay the fines levied by Parliment and they took the decision to dismantle some of the defences. The castle was restored by its owners during the 19th and 20th century and in 1925 it was given to the National Trust and opened to the public.

 

Some pictures from a recent visit to the Kent and East Sussex Railway.

The Railway line from Robertsbridge to Tenterden opened in 1900, with extensions in 1903 and again in 1905 as far as Headcorn. It was envisaged that the line would go onto the county town of Maidstone, but this section was never built. the line struggled through the 1930’s as competition from Road Transport cut into its financial viability. Following the nationalisation of the Railway in 1948, the situation did not improve and figures from 1953 showed that each week 90 trains were run on the line and between them they carried only 118 passengers a week! The line was closed the following year for passengers although goods continued to be hauled on the line until 1961. A battle to preserve the line began and the first trains ran over a 2-mile section in 1974. The line was extended to Nortiam in 1990 and to Bodiam in 2000.

Tenterden Town station

Copy of notice for Withdrawal of passenger services on the line which now forms the KESR

D9504, an unusual design with a central cab, at Tenterden

Locos and utility trains in the sidings at Tenterden

Travelling through rolling Countryside

Approaching the terminus at Bodiam

Norweigan state Railway 21C class locomotive at Bodiam.

D2024 awaiting restoration at Bodiam. Worked at BR depot at Lincoln, Hartlepool docks and Grangemouth before arriving at KESR in 1980

 

Bluebell Railway 2017

Posted: April 26, 2017 in Sussex, Trains, UK
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73082 Camelot approaching East Grinstead

Although the main reason for visiting the Bluebell Railway was to photograph Flying Scotsman, a number of other locomotives were also in steam on that day.

73082 at Horsted Keynes

30541 at Horsted Keynes

647 approaching Horsted Keynes

263 in the loco yard at Sheffield Park

60103 ‘Flying Scotsman’ is probably one of the most famous and iconic heritage steam engines in the UK and this past Bank Holiday weekend it has come south from its home at York to run on the Bluebell Railway in Sussex.

 

60103 at East Grinstead

Built as LNER4472, an A1 Pacific class locomotive at Doncaster, it entered into service in February 1923. It didn’t receive a name until the following year when it was part of the British Empire exhibition when it was decided to name it after the daily express train from London Kings Cross to Edinburgh ‘The Flying Scotsman’. It 1924 it became the first locomotive to officially be recorded as reaching 100mph and it headed the first non-stop run between London and Edinburgh in May 1928.

Model of 4472 as originally built

In the 1940s the A1 class was rebuilt and remodelled into the new design A3 Pacifics and 4472 underwent this process in 1947 and was renumbered the following year as 60103 following the nationalisation of the railways.

60103 preparing to leave East Grinstead with southbound service.

60103 approaches Horsted Keynes at head of northbound service

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It hauled its last passenger train on 14th January 1963 between Kings Cross and Leeds. It was bought by Alan Pegler, who put it to work running charter trains. In 1967 it visited the USA as part of a tour to promote British goods and services and was very successful. However, an attempt to repeat this in 1969, saw the company go into bankruptcy and 60103 was seized by American creditors.

60103 at Sheffield Park

A rescue operation was put together and new owners purchased the engine and it arrived back in the UK in February 1972. It split its time between mainline charters and work on the now growing number of heritage railways. In 1988 it visited Australia and set the record for the longest ever non-stop run for a steam locomotive (Alice Springs to Perth). Returning the opposite way to which it went out it became the first, and possibly the only, Steam locomotive to have circumnavigated the world.

60103 at Sheffield Park

In 1993 it became necessary to restrict its running to heritage lines and two years later it was withdrawn from service. it returned to running in 1999 and continued to run until 2004 when it was bought by the National Railway Museum, who embarked on a 10-year refurbishment programme. 60103 returned to steam in February 2014.

LMS 8F '48624' at Horstead Keynes

8F ‘48624’ at Horstead Keynes

48624 was built at Ashford in Kent and entered service in 1943. Its service was on heavy goods trains and it was withdrawn from service in 1965 following a fractured steam pipe. It was sent to Barry scrap-works where it stayed until being rescued in 1981. 28 years of restoration later it was returned to service and 2 years later it transferred to its current home on the Great Central Railway.

 

 

LMS 8F '48624' leaves Horstead Keynes

8F ‘48624’ leaves Horstead Keynes

B12 '8572' at Horstead Keynes

B12 ‘8572’ at Horstead Keynes

8572 was built for the LNER and entered service in June 1928. It spent almost all of its working life in East Anglia until it was withdrawn in 1959 at the same time as all the B12’s. However, it soon found it’s way back into use and was finally withdrawn in 1961. It spent a number of years hauling rail tours on BR tracks before arriving at North Norfolk railway in 1967, where it was externally restored and put on static display. It was finally restored and returned to service in 1995.

 

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S15 '847' at East Grinstead

S15 ‘847’ at East Grinstead

A trip down to the Bluebell Railway for the first day of the Giants of Steam weekend.

My journey from East Grinstead was on Southern 847 to Horstead Keynes which gives an excellent opportunity to view trains on services in each direction.

B12 '8572' at Horstead Keynes

B12 ‘8572’ at Horstead Keynes

The first train was LNER B12 8572, visiting for the gala from North Norfolk Railway, followed by Standard 5MT 73082 ‘Camelot’ travelling in the opposite direction.

73082 'Camelot' approaches Horstead Keynes

73082 ‘Camelot’ approaches Horstead Keynes

Next visitor was the other visiting loco – LMS 8F 48624 from the Great Central Railway.

LMS 8F '48624' at Horstead Keynes

LMS 8F ‘48624’ at Horstead Keynes

 

LMS 8F '48624' leaves Horstead Keynes

LMS 8F ‘48624’ leaves Horstead Keynes

Then on to Sheffield Park for a visit to the engine shed. SECR P-class 263 ‘Bluebell Railway’ was in steam in the yard.

SECR P class 263 at Sheffield Park

SECR P class 263 at Sheffield Park

My return journey to East Grinstead was on a train hauled by the B12.

LNER B12 '8572'

LNER B12 ‘8572’

An excellent day and some good photo opportunities.