Posts Tagged ‘Mint Moth’

Mint Moth

Posted: September 5, 2019 in Butterflies and Moths, Natural History
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This common moth was once only found in chalk and limestone grassland, quarries, woodland or marshland, but is increasingly being reported from gardens. There are two generations, occurring from mid-April to June and again from July to mid-September. Flies actively in the sunshine and also at night.

I decided to make a diversion on the way back home from the town centre and have a look around the gardens of Eltham Palace. This can be a very good place for insects in the summer months despite its busyness as a tourist attraction.

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There were plenty of Gatekeepers on the grass meadow along with a few meadow Browns and a couple of small white butterflies. A dragonfly flew by (either Southern or Migrant Hawker) but I was not able to see it well enough to confirm its identity

Gatekeeper

Gatekeeper

Meadow Brown

Meadow Brown

In the flower margins I found a Mint Moth and a large Buff-tailed Bumblebee (might well be a Queen judging by size and amount of buff in tail).

Mint Moth

Mint Moth

Buff-tailed bumblebee

Buff-tailed bumblebee

I finished my walk by the moat, where there are some lily pads to see if there where any damselflies present. It was a surprise to find half a dozen Red-eyed damselflies, which I have not recorded her before. Later closer examination of photos showed that these were in fact Small Red-eyed damselfly, which makes this the 3rd site in Greenwich borough I have recorded for this species.

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Small Red-eyed Damselfly

Small Red-eyed Damselfly

This species is a recent newcomer to the UK being first recorded in SE England in 1999. It has now spread and is found from Devon in the west, through the midlands and up as far as Yorkshire in the north. However in recent years its spread has slowed down and it does not seem to be spreading much beyond this region.

An excellent hours diversion which just shows that you dont have to travel far to observe interesting wildlife.