Posts Tagged ‘Red Fox’

Red Fox

Posted: October 4, 2016 in Mammals, Natural History
Tags:

DSCN1230-1

The most widespread canine mammal in the world, Red Fox is a highly adaptive species living in habitats from urban cities to deserts.

DSCN1934a

They live in family groups and are best seen when the cubs have newly emerged and are exploring. The calls of the fox are often shrill and piercing and can be quite disturbing to someone who is not familiar to hearing them.

DSCN1913b

DSCN1913 a

 

 

DSCN6778

As I am off for 10 days in Northumbria on Saturday I have been trying to get round my survey sites before I go. This afternoon I did the weeks butterfly and dragonfly walk on my patch. It started well with a female Brimstone in the garden as I was leaving the house. Another couple of males were present by the Tarn together with Orange Tip; Holly Blue and the years first speckled Wood.

Speckled Wood

Speckled Wood

Searching along the edges of the Tarn i came across another creature watching the Tarn. In this case i would imagine looking for something to stray too close. He or she sat there for quite sometime hardly moving at all and was still there when I moved on from that section.

Red Fox

Red Fox

The first water-bird young have arrived. Eleven young Greylag geese accompanied by 4 adults so I presume this is two broods. At least one other is still on a nest on the islands.

DSCN6791a

Parent keeps an eye on me whilst I photograph the goslings

Parent keeps an eye on me whilst I photograph the goslings

DSCN6790a

Also the first Mallard chicks

DSCN6785a

I couldn’t find any Canada Geese nests but these may be hidden on the islands. But the coots still seem to be building nests.

Coot

Coot

The Egyptian Geese which arrived a couple of weeks ago are still present.

Egyptian Goose

Egyptian Goose

Disappointing is that the damselfly pool looks in very poor condition. There is almost no live vegetation and I am worried that there is nothing left alive in it. It is connected to the main lake by a pipe so it is likely affected by the woes that have troubled the main lake and it may be they have hit hardest here, because of the lack of drainage and water movement. This will be a major loss as 4 out of the 10 dragonfly species found in the area are located solely on this pond.

Greylag Goose [sp] (Anser anser)
Canada Goose [sp] (Branta canadensis)
Egyptian Goose (Alopochen aegyptiaca)
Muscovy Duck (Cairina moschata)
Mallard [sp] (Anas platyrhynchos)
Grey Heron [sp] (Ardea cinerea)
Common Moorhen [sp] (Gallinula chloropus)
Eurasian Coot [sp] (Fulica atra)
Common Pigeon [sp] (Columba livia)
Common Wood Pigeon [sp] (Columba palumbus)
Rose-ringed Parakeet [sp] (Psittacula krameri)
Eurasian Magpie [sp] (Pica pica)
Carrion Crow [sp] (Corvus corone)
Great Tit [sp] (Parus major)
Eurasian Blue Tit [sp] (Cyanistes caeruleus)
Eurasian Wren [sp] (Troglodytes troglodytes)
Common Blackbird [sp] (Turdus merula)
European Robin [sp] (Erithacus rubecula)
Dunnock [sp] (Prunella modularis)

Orange Tip (Anthocharis cardamines)
Brimstone (Gonepteryx rhamni)
Holly Blue (Celastrina argiolus)
Speckled Wood [sp] (Pararge aegeria)

Here are some pictures of visitorsto our feeding station yesterday

DSCN4882a
Common Pigeon

DSCN4866a

DSCN4868a
Red Fox

DSCN4874a

DSCN4877a
Grey Squirrel

DSCN4880a
Jay

DSCN0645
Magpie

The garden has been very quiet of late. The birds have been recovering from the breeding season and moulting their feathers so have tended to keep well hidden. The feeder station has been all-but deserted. However today there seems to be a lot more activity with Robin, Blue Tit, Dunnock and Great Tit all visiting the feeders. The Nuthatch was seen in his/her favourite trees and later one paid a brief visit to the feeders. There have also been parties of Goldfinches and Ring-necked Parakeets in the trees and a Greater Spotted Woodpecker flew through the garden in the morning.

Dunnock

Dunnock

Robin

Robin

Great Tit

Great Tit

Blue Tit

Blue Tit

Ring Necked Parakeet

Ring Necked Parakeet

 

A Red Fox spent some time in the afternoon nosing around the borders looking for food

Red Fox

Red Fox

Red Fox

Red Fox

Red Fox

Red Fox

A late Speckled Wood butterfly was a first record this year for the garden and a Migrant Hawker has been zooming round the trees

Speckled Wood

Speckled Wood

We had an unusual daytime visitor to the garden today. We often hear our local Red Foxes at night especially when they have cubs, but it is unusual to see them foraging in the garden during daylight hours. We watched this one for sometime but of course as soon as I went to get the camera he/she decided it was time to move on and disappeared into the hedge.

DSCN1913 a

DSCN1914a

DSCN1913b