St Sephulchre without Newgate

Posted: February 9, 2018 in History, London, UK
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The original church on this site dated from Saxon times was dedicated to Edmund, King and Martyr. In the 12th century this was changed to St Edmund and the holy sepulchre and over time the church just became known as St Sepulchre. The church was rebuilt in the 15th century but was gutted by the Great Fire of London in 1666. It was restored in the 18th century.

St Sepulchre is the ‘bells of Old Bailey’ mentioned in the nursery rhyme oranges and lemons. It stands just across the road from the courts and the bells concerned are thought to refer to those rung before executions at nearby Newgate.

It is the patron church of musicians and the church of the Royal Fusiliers (of London Regiment).

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