Archive for the ‘Ships’ Category

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A Sloop launched at Sheerness in Kent in August 1878 she saw service in the Pacific from 1879-1883 before returning to the UK. In 1885 she was sent to the Mediterranean sea and was used in anti-slavery patrols. She also saw action off the coast of the Sudan and Eygpt. From November 1888 she was assigned to carry out survey work in the Meditteranean Sea, which she did until 1891 and again from 1892-1895.

In March 1895 she returned to Chatham, where she was assigned to Harbour duties. In 1900 she was used as accommodation by the South Eastern and Chatham Railway Co at Grain. In 1903 she became the Royal Navy volunteer reserve drill ship moored in the London docks and was renamed HMS President after its predecessor in that role. She was relieved of that duty by HMS Buzzard in spring of 1911. In 1913 she was loaned out as a training ship under the command of C B Fry, the famous Cricketer and transferred to the River Hamble where she served as a dormitory for boys training to join the Royal Navy. She remained at Hamble until the school closed in 1968. The ship was given to the Maritime Trust for restoration, the years in the Hamble having taken a toll on the structure. Restored to her 1888 glory she was, in 1994, passed onto the Chatham Historic Dockyard Trust where she is now on display.

 

 

 

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HMS Cavalier 

Built at Cowes on the Isle of Wight, HMS Cavalier was launched in March 1943. She served in the Home Fleet during World war II, mostly on Russian and Scandinavian bound conveys and post-war in India and the Far East until she was decommissioned in 1972.

She is the last surviving example of a British WWII destroyer and as such was an important heritage vessel. She was purchased by the Cavalier Trust. As a privately owned vessel, she holds a naval warrant to retain the ‘HMS’ title and to fly the white ensign of the Royal Navy. She was originally docked at Southampton, then in 1983 moved to Brighton and four years later to the River Tyne. Following a period of restoration, she was purchased by Chatham Historic Dockyard and arrived on site in May 1998. She was housed in No 2 dry-dock, the same dock where Nelson’s HMS Victory was built.

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In 2007 HMS Cavalier was officially designated as a war memorial to the destroyers sunk during WWII (142) and the men who lost their lives serving on them (around 11000).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tugboat

The Dockyard had an extensive railway network

 

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Clocktower storehouse built in 1723

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HMS Gannet, a sloop launched in 1878. She became a training ship in 1903 and continued in this role until 1968.

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Timber seasoning sheds (1774)

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Mast House (1753)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

XE8 Midget Submarine Expunger built in 1944 for operations in the far east. It was sunk as an underwater target at HMS station Portland but was salvaged in 1973. It is the only known survivor of its class.

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Railway Carriage believed to have been used by General Kitchener during his campaign in the Sudan.

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Dockyard Railway equipment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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HMS Ocelot, an Oberon class submarine launched from Chatham Dockyard in May 1962. She was the last submarine to be built at Chatham. She was decommissioned in August 1991 and put on display in the dockyard.

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A memorial to the 11000 sailors who lost their lives whilst serving on Royal Naval destroyers in WWII.

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The storage buildings at the southern end of the dockyard are over a quarter of a mile long

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One of these building contains the Ropery, which still makes ropes today

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Garden of Commissioners House, a lovely place to have lunch

 

 

 

 

Greenwich Re-visited

Posted: October 31, 2017 in History, London, Ships, UK
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Model of Cutty Sark

Last Friday went to Greenwich with Steve Evans to see the Cutty Sark.

 

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Greenwich Heritage Centre

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Looking towards Canary Wharf and Docklands

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Greenwich foot tunnel (under River Thames) with City in background

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Old Royal Naval College (now University of Greenwich)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Lunching under the Keel

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Keith and I entered the dockyard through the main gatehouse which dates from 1722.

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Figurehead from HMS Wellesley, a 74 gun battleship launched in Bombay in 1815 and named after Marquis Wellesley, Governor General of India and brother of the Duke of Wellington

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The Commissioners House was built in 1704 as a residence for the dockyard’s senior officer

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The Destroyer HMS Cavalier was launched in 1944 and saw service with the Royal Navy till 1972. She is now berthed in the same dock where Chatham’s most famous ship HMS Victory was built.

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Model of Chatham’s most famous ship HMS Victory

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Old Dockyard Shops

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One of the sheds houses the Royal National Lifeboat Institutions national collection. This is a Watson lifeboat which saw service at Margate in Kent from 1951-81.

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Number 3 slip. Originally erected in 1838 as a place where large ships could be built under cover, The slipway was filled in during the early 20th century and used as a place to store boats out of the water

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At the time the slipway was filled in this mezzanine floor was added to provide storage space for small boats taken from ships undergoing repairs in the dockyard

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3 Slip today holds a collection of Dockyard equipment and machinery

 

Our River cruise on the Medway took us past Chatham Historic Dockyard

Reminders of Chatham’s military history now blend into the environment

Old Dockyard sheds

HMS Cavalier, a destroyer launched in 1944 which served for 28 years in the Atlantic, Pacific and Baltic oceans.

The tower of HMS Ocelot, a submarine, shows over the dock wall. It was the last naval ship built in the Dockyard at Chatham. Launched 1962.

HMS Gannet, a sloop, built at nearby Sheerness in 1878. Used as a patrol and communications boat.

The Submarine sheds. Now used as repair shops for ferry boats.

Dockyard cranes

 

 

We were very fortunate to get some great views of Tall Ships while we were crossing the river on the cable car.

 

Keith and I spent a day at the Tall Ships festival this week. Our first stop was at The Royal Arsenal at Woolwich where a number of visiting ships were berthed.

Artemis built in 1926 as a whaler. Later converted to a freighter and now used as a floating hotel cruising the Baltic.

Replica of The Nao Victoria which circumnavigated the world in 1519-1522

Tolkien was built as a diesel powered tug operating out of Rostock. In 1995 she was in Rotterdam when the company who owned her went bankrupt. She was bought by a private individual who removed her diesel engines and converted her into a top-sail schooner. She operates cruises in the Baltic and the North Sea

 

TS Royalist belongs to the Sea Cadets and is used for training.

When the ships leave Greenwich on Sunday, they will sail to Portugal before crossing the Atlantic to Canada.

Golden Hinde

Posted: March 24, 2017 in Devon, History, Medieval History, Ships, UK
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This full sized replica of the Tudor Warship, Golden Hinde, has been berthed in Brixham Harbour for over 50 years.

It serves as a museum to the life and voyages of Sir Francis Drake. The Golden Hinde was his most famous ship in which he circumnavigated the world on a journey of over 36,000 miles.