Archive for the ‘Cambridgeshire’ Category

On Saturday Sue and I, together with two friends Andrew and James, visited the Nene Valley Railway near Peterborough.This line is interesting as unlike most preserved railways it was not closed down as part of the cuts to the network in the 1960’s, but had actually closed to regular traffic in the late 1930’s.

Wansford Station

 

Wansford Station

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unfortunately, we found on arrival that our steam train scheduled for the day had failed and so we would be diesel hauled on our trip. The line runs from Yarwell into Peterborough through the Cambridgeshire countryside.

Class 31 diesel engine. Built for BR at Loughborough in 1961 and used in the Midland Region. It was withdrawn from mainline service in 2000.

34081 92 Squadron in the yard – A Bulleid ‘Battle of Britain Class locomotive. Built at Brighton in 1948, it worked on Southern Region until 1964, when it was sent to Woodhams in Barry. It was purchased by a group set up to preserve a ‘Battle of Britain class locomotive and overhauled at Wansford. It returned to steam in 1998. It is named after a Spitfire squadron based at Biggin Hill during the Battle of Britain

We did get to see some of the other engines in the yard and some of the other exhibits of Railway memorabilia.

Thomas the Tank Engine – An 0-6-0T built in 1947 and used at the British Sugar factory in nearby Peterborough. Arrived at Nene Valley in 1973

Swedish Railcar 1212

DL83 -built in 1967 it operated first at Corby Quarry before in 1971 being transferred to the Lillie Bridge depot of London Transport where it continued to work until its withdrawal in 1989

Signal Box at Wansford

Travelling Post Office

Turntable at Wansford. Originally from Peterborough East and installed here in 1997

 

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Occupation on this site dates back to the arrival of a group of Augustinian friars who acquired the land in the 12th century and built a friary (remains of which can still be seen today incorporated into the later house).

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The friars were evicted in 1535 following the dissolution of the monasteries and after standing unused for 65 years the property passed to Thomas Hobson who built a country house on the site incorporating some of the remaining parts of the original friary. He changed the name from ‘Anglesey Friary’ to ‘Anglesey Abbey’.

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In 1926 the property was bought by 2 brothers, Huttleston and Henry Broughton, Both were keen on horse racing and owned a stud in nearby Newmarket, one of the centres of horse racing in the UK. Their father was Urban Broughton, an American who had made a fortune in mining and railways and their mother was Cara Rogers an heiress from a prominant American oil family.

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In 1929 Huttleston was created 1st Lord Fairhaven. This honour was originally intended for his father, but unfortunately he passed away before it could be conferred and so it passed to his eldest son.

In 1930 Henry married and moved away and Huttleston set about restoring the house and gardens. He was a notable art collector and exhibited his purchases in the house.

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Huttleston died in 1966 and having no heirs left the estate to the National Trust who now administer it.

Fenland Cottage (2)

Posted: October 16, 2015 in Cambridgeshire, UK
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Some photos of the rooms inside the cottage at Wicken Fen.

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Fenland Cottage (1)

Posted: October 15, 2015 in Cambridgeshire, UK
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From the 17th century onwards small communities developed at the edge of the Fens to serve the growing local industries of turf and sedge cutting.

A picture taken in 1988 of the cottage before restoration

A picture taken in 1988 of the cottage before restoration

Living conditions in the cottages were very basic. Drinking water was obtained from a pump by the road-side. each dwelling had a bucket-closet, emptied at night by the soil-man.

The Bucket-closet

The Bucket-closet

This example of a Fenland cottage has been restored as part of the historical display at Wicken Fen in Cambridgeshire.

 

The workshop

The workshop

The Barn

The Barn

Ely Cathedral (2))

Posted: June 18, 2015 in Cambridgeshire, UK
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The great West Door is the main entrance into the Cathedral

 

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From the openness of the outside you enter into the enclosed space of the portico

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You arrive at the Great West Doors

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Entry to the Cathedral is by the small door within the left hand door and then suddenly you are confronted with the lofty nave with its wonderful arches and  ceilings and your gaze is drawn up and along to the far end of the cathedral.

 

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The Cathedral in Ely is known locally as  ‘The ship of the Fens’ due to its visibility from miles around the city. there has been an abbey on this site since 672AD but the current building was started at the beginning of the 12th century and developed further over the next 250 years.

The Cathedral Precinct wall

The Cathedral Precinct wall

The War Memorial in the Cathedral precinct wall

The War Memorial in the Cathedral precinct wall

 

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Across the green from the Cathedral stands the Old Bishops Palace. When the Bishop moved to more modern accomodation, the palace became a care home. More recently it has been refurbished and opened in 2012 as the sixth form college of Kings school Ely

 

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A very brief view of Ely

Posted: June 16, 2015 in Cambridgeshire, UK
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The river Great Ouse

The river Great Ouse

A brief visit to Ely and a chance to spend an hour of so on Saturday afternoon walking round the city. It is an interesting mix of old and new with small terraced roads and open areas such as the Maltings on the banks of the Great Ouse.

City market in the square

City market in the square

Leading up to the High Street

Leading up to the High Street

The most famous things about Ely are its connection with Oliver Cromwell (the only republican leader in English history from 1653-58 as Lord Protector) and its magnificent cathedral.

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Ely Cathedral

The Cathedral can be seen from many places in the city and from the surrounding countryside

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Echoes of church in the architecture?

Echoes of church in the architecture?

 

There are some suprises. I thought this was the entrance gateway to a large house, but it turned out to be a gateway to the Park

An entrance gate to Ely Park

An enterance gate to Ely Park

A terraced street

A terraced street

The river Great Ouse

The river Great Ouse