Posts Tagged ‘Fossils’

Lyme Regis

Posted: February 15, 2019 in Dorset, UK
Tags: ,

This post is originally from the summer of 2014 and our first visit to Lyme Regis

Lyme Regis is a quiet coastal town and harbour in Dorset on the south coast of the UK.

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Lyme Regis - June 2005 - Ammonite Street Lights at Dusk
Street lights in Lyme Regis
Photo by Gareth Williams (https://www.flickr.com/photos/gareth1953/)

It’s fame springs from the fact that it provides one of the most accessible beaches along the Jurassic coast and has been a magnet for fossil hunters for at least 150 years.

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When Sue and I were in Dorset we paid a visit and went out on an organised fossil hunt. The leader explained what to look for and then took us to a place on the beach where there were likely to be fossils.

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The rest was down to us.

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Some ammonites we found on Lyme Regis beach

Some of my favourite fossils from the exhibition

Pterosaur

Cast of pterosaur

Cast of pterosaur

Pterosaur

Pterosaur

Model of pterosaur

Model of pterosaur

Pygopterus

Pygopterus - a preditory fish

Pygopterus – a preditory fish

Icthyosaur

icthyosaur paddle

icthyosaur paddle

icthyosaur paddle

icthyosaur paddle

Icthyosaur

Icthyosaur

I think Ammonites must have been a fearsome looking creature as they made there way around the ancient seas.

Titanes Amonite

Titanes Amonite

Amonite

Amonite

Amonite

Amonite

The Nautilus is the only remaining cephlapod with an external shell and this video gives some idea of what the fossil Ammonites would have been like only bigger.

Nautilus by Frank Lame (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCrXjnF_xoETdRe8LvFfZg6Q)

On a recent visit to Newcastle I had the opportunity to pop into the Great Northern Museum (formerly the Hancock Museum) and visit an excellent exhibition on fossils.

The Great Northern Museum, Newcastle

The Great Northern Museum, Newcastle

Crinoids

Crinoids

Crinoids

Crinoids

A model of how Crinoids would have looked.

A model of how Crinoids would have looked.

Crinoids can still be found today in tropical seas

By Alexander Vasenin (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Alexander Vasenin (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

By Alexander Vasenin (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Alexander Vasenin (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Another fascinating exhibit in the Bones and Stones exhibition at the Library of Birmingham was a ‘pavement’ covered with prehistoric footprints

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With sometime to kill in Birmingham on Saturday before my train left for London, I went to the new Library of Birmingham building to see an exhibition called ‘Stones and Bones’ about the geology of the West Midlands.

Library of Birmingham
Library of Birmingham
Photo by Peter Broster (https://www.flickr.com/photos/remedy451/)

Many shelves
Photo by Ben (https://www.flickr.com/photos/benelwell/)

The most stunning thing in the exhibition was the collection of fossils, one of the best I think I have ever seen.

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