Posts Tagged ‘Segedunum Roman Fort’

Central building complex at Segedunum Fort

Central building complex at Segedunum Fort

Within the site at Segedunum Fort there is also a reconstruction of a Roman bath-house. It comprises 5 rooms:

The Changing room – where the bathers would change their clothes, relax and play games either before or after taking a bath

The Changing room

The Changing room

The Cold room (Frigidarium)-  a cold plunge pool

The cold bath

The cold bath

The Hot room (Caldarium) – here the heat was moistened from a water fountain to aid with sweating and cleaning

The Tepidarium

The Caldarium

The Warm room (Tepidarium) – with a temperature between the Frigidarium and the Caldarium, it could be accessed from both as either a place to warm up or cool down before returning to the Changing room.

The Tepidarium

The Tepidarium

The four rooms above form the classical suite of rooms in a Roman bath, but there is also a fifth room at Segedunum:

The Hot Dry room (Iaconicum) – this was hotter than the Caldarium and provided a dry heat to encourage sweating.

 

A model of Segedunum fort c 200AD

A model of Segedunum fort c 200AD

 

In the museum at Segedunum, there are re-constructions of a barrack room and the shrine within the Principia where the military standards and trophies were kept.

Reconstruction of barrack room

Reconstruction of barrack room

The Shrine

The Shrine

Infantry standards

Infantry standards

Cavalry Draco standards

Cavalry Draco standards

For more information on the draco standards carried by Roman cavalry see these previous blog posts:

https://petesfavouritethings.wordpress.com/2013/03/05/roman-cavalry/

https://petesfavouritethings.wordpress.com/2014/04/13/the-draco/

 

A model of Segedunum fort c 200AD

A model of Segedunum fort c 200AD

The eastern end of Hadrian’s wall was at Segedunum Roman Fort on the Tyne estuary, east of Newcastle. The main wall, which at this point was 2.3m wide and 4,5m high met the fort on it’s eastern wall.

Model of Hadrian's wall at its eastern end

Model of Hadrian’s wall at its eastern end

A small branch wall then ran down from the south wall of the fort to the river’s edge and a monument situated in the river.

Remains of branch wall south of fort

Remains of branch wall south of fort

Artist's impression of monument at river end of branch wall

Artist’s impression of monument at river end of branch wall

This site had been chosen because it was on a bend in the river and gave excellent visibility in all directions. Fortlets existed on the Northern side of the estuary between Segedunum and the estuary mouth, which was guarded by the fort of Arbeia (modern day South Shields) on the south bank.

The site of Segedunum Fort from the Tower Observatory

The site of Segedunum Fort from the Tower Observatory

Wallsend is now a suburb of Newcastle. The name dates from the 11th century and refers to the most eastern end of Hadrians Wall, which runs from The west coast at the Solway Firth to the Tyne estuary on the east coast. The wall was built during the reign of Hadrian (cAD 122) as a frontier line for the empire. It took about 6 years to build.

 

Bust of Emperor Hadrian

Bust of Emperor Hadrian

The Roman name for Wallsend was Segedunum a word composed from two British words meaning ‘strong place’ and ‘victory fort’. It is not known why the Romans used British words for the names of forts, but we can imagine that they were a message to the conquered people in a language they would understand, since few Celts would have spoken Latin.

Barrack block at Segedunum

Barrack block at Segedunum

Central building complex at Segedunum Fort

Central building complex at Segedunum Fort

A model of Segedunum fort c 200AD

A model of Segedunum fort c 200AD

The Fort at Segedunum was occupied by a mixed auxilliary force of cavalry and infantry. In AD 200 this comprised of 480 Infantry and 120 cavalry, although this may have varied over time. It was occupied for over 300 years.

Cavalry auxiliary c 200AD

Cavalry auxiliary c 200AD

Pottery found at Segedunum fort

Pottery found at Segedunum fort

Jar found at Segedunum fort

Jar found at Segedunum fort