Naturelog:14th June

Posted: June 15, 2015 in Birds, Natural History, Norfolk, UK
Tags: , ,
Welney

Welney

Have been in Cambridgeshire for a short visit staying at Ely and time to do a morning’s nature watching on the way back to London on Sunday. The weather could be better, but then it could be a lot worse. Our first stop is at Welney Wildfowl reserve in Norfolk. OK not strictly on the way back to London as it lies 10 miles in the opposite direction, but on hearing their sightings from Saturday, the lure of the possibility of a lifetime first species is too big. We arrive at the reserve at 1000 and there is hardly anyone else there – not an encouraging sign but we make our way to the reserve centre. The warden has been out this morning but has not been able to re-locate the bird, a Red-necked Phalarope, but we are here now and lets give it a go. It had been seen in 2 places on the reserve and we make our way to the first hide, but there is no sign. We make our way along the path when we are brought short by a strange and distinctive song coming from the undergrowth. I am puzzled for a while but the thought of Quail, also a life first species, goes through my brain but I dismiss it.

Lyle Pool Welney

Lyle Pool Welney

On ward we go and arrive at the Lyle hide. I begin to scan the pool and it seems there is nothing but Shelduck and Redshank and then suddenly there it is, swimming at the back of the pool – a Red-necked Phalarope in summer plumage. A longer look and a few record shots and then back to the reserve centre letting others know on the way that the bird is still there.

Red-necked Phalarope at Welney

Red-necked Phalarope at Welney

After a celebration coffee its off to Wicken Fen.

Wicken Fen

Wicken Fen

Feeling lucky I want to chance my arm at one of the best Dragonfly reserves in the UK and hopefully pick up a few new species for the year and another potential life first species, the Variable Damselfly. But the weather is against me – in fact I draw a big fat zero when it comes to Dragonflies and butterflies. Well you can chance your luck too much.

Windmill used to control water level on fen

Windmill used to control water level on fen

Oh and by the way that strange song we heard was later confirmed by listening to a recording and subsequent confirmation by other birders to be a singing male Quail, so it was two lifers in one morning and you cant complain about that!

Wicken Fen

Wicken Fen

Red-legged Partridge [sp] (Alectoris rufa)
Common Quail [sp] (Coturnix coturnix)
Common Pheasant [sp] (Phasianus colchicus)
Greylag Goose [sp] (Anser anser)
Canada Goose [sp] (Branta canadensis)
Mute Swan (Cygnus olor)
Common Shelduck (Tadorna tadorna)
Gadwall (Anas strepera)
Eurasian Wigeon (Anas penelope)
Mallard [sp] (Anas platyrhynchos)
Northern Shoveler (Anas clypeata)
Eurasian Teal [sp] (Anas crecca)
Grey Heron [sp] (Ardea cinerea)
Little Egret [sp] (Egretta garzetta)
Common Buzzard [sp] (Buteo buteo)
Common Kestrel [sp] (Falco tinnunculus)
Common Moorhen [sp] (Gallinula chloropus)
Eurasian Coot [sp] (Fulica atra)
Northern Lapwing (Vanellus vanellus)
Common Redshank [sp] (Tringa totanus)
Red-necked Phalarope (Phalaropus lobatus)
Black-headed Gull (Chroicocephalus ridibundus)
Common Wood Pigeon [sp] (Columba palumbus)
Eurasian Collared Dove [sp] (Streptopelia decaocto)
Eurasian Magpie [sp] (Pica pica)
Western Jackdaw [sp] (Coloeus monedula)
Carrion Crow [sp] (Corvus corone)
Great Tit [sp] (Parus major)
Barn Swallow [sp] (Hirundo rustica)
Common House Martin [sp] (Delichon urbicum)
Cetti’s Warbler [sp] (Cettia cetti)
Sedge Warbler (Acrocephalus schoenobaenus)
Eurasian Reed Warbler [sp] (Acrocephalus scirpaceus)
Eurasian Wren [sp] (Troglodytes troglodytes)
Common Starling [sp] (Sturnus vulgaris)
Common Blackbird [sp] (Turdus merula)
European Robin [sp] (Erithacus rubecula)
House Sparrow [sp] (Passer domesticus)
Dunnock [sp] (Prunella modularis)
Pied Wagtail [sp] (Motacilla alba)
European Greenfinch [sp] (Carduelis chloris)
European Goldfinch [sp] (Carduelis carduelis)

Comments
  1. sed30 says:

    Reblogged this on sed30's Blog and commented:
    Lovely part of the world

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