Archive for the ‘Birds’ Category

On Monday Sue and I travelled down to Sevenoaks Nature Reserve to meet our friends Keith and Elaine for a, socially distanced, picnic lunch. It was the first time we had been able to meet up this year. After lunch Keith and I went for a walk around the reserve.

Blackcaps and Chiffchaffs provided most of the musical accompaniment as we searched each of the lakes that make up this reserve. Although the number of bird species present was low (not surprising at this time of year) we managed 6 species of Butterfly and 5 species of Dragonfly. it was a lovely summer afternoon and a lovely walk around the lakes.

Come with me to one of the best Nature Reserves in the country as we visited Oare Marshes last week. The best bird was a Little Gull, sadly to far away to photograph

We visited the centre last week. It was pretty quiet but it was a lovely walk.

Nice to see that even if we are in Lockdown, nature is carrying on as normal

Haven’t seen a sign of the first batch , but here are the second lot! They don’t waste time! On the Rhogo pond with 2 pairs of Tufties and a family of Canadas. Meanwhile back at L’dod lake another brief appearance of a Sedge Warb up the southern end opposite the woodland path where Bazz […]

More wee grebes. — Radnor Bird Blog

Hyde Park

Posted: June 18, 2020 in Birds, Landscape, Natural History
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A walk around Hyde Park in central London

Our trip out this week was a return to Bough Beech near Sevenoaks. I was returning for two reasons. One the local dragonfly recorder had asked for photographs of the Brilliant Emerald Dragonfly I had seen last week in order to confirm the record (I hadn’ t managed any last week) and secondly because a Western Osprey had been hanging around the Reservoir all weekend.

Our first sightings, however, were of a human kind as we met up with Andrew and Nicole, who we hadn’t seen since before lockdown and so it was good chance to catch up with them. They directed me to a Little Ringed Plover they had found on the edge of the reservoir and also described another wader which they had seen briefly in a channel in the vegetation on the north pool before it had disappeared from sight into the vegetation.

After they had left, I got another brief view of the mystery wader and although not totally sure thought it was probably Green Sandpiper. Amongst the other birds on the reservoir today were Common Terns and Grey Wagtail as well as the usual selection of Ducks, Swans and Geese. A female Mandarin Duck with 12 chicks was a pleasant sight.

I then decided to walk up to the Oast house to see if I could get the photographs of Brilliant Emerald. What a difference a week makes! the temperature was about 10 degrees lower than last week and whereas then there were about 40 insects from 5 species present, not a single one was to be seen today. I did hear Common Whitethroat and Chiffchaff and got excellent views of the resident Kingfisher.

Common Whitethroat. Photo by Nicole

Back at the Reservoir, I though I would give the mystery wader one more go. Imagine my surprise when I looked into the channel and there it was, a Green Sandpiper, sitting out on a rock in plain view. I tried to get a photo but the hedge vegetation has grown so high that I couldn’t get a clear shot before it wandered off into the vegetation and out of view.

Green Sandpiper. Photo by Corine Bliek (https://www.flickr.com/photos/147485441@N04/)

A good end to our trip.

Birds of the Tarn

Posted: May 19, 2020 in Birds, London, Natural History, UK
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Some brilliant photos. Scarlet Tanager one of the most attractive birds in the world?

Green gives and red receives. Nature is colour coded! ~Sonali Mohan Some of you may have known him, and, even if you didn’t, you may have one of his bluebird boxes in your yard. Jack Finch started a non-profit, Homes For Bluebirds, to help restore his beloved Eastern Bluebird to the skies of the southeast. […]

Mulberry Moments — Roads End Naturalist

Two new visitors

Posted: April 16, 2020 in Birds, Natural History
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Two new species singing in the garden this last week. Blackcap and Song Thrush typify two ends of the changing scene in the UK with regard to bird populations.

The Blackcap used to be a summer visitor but with the increasingly mild winters many are now increasingly being seen in the winter. It is unclear, as far as I know, whether these are UK breeding birds that have not migrated or breeding birds from further north which have just not migrated further south.

Blackcap
Photo by Pete Beard (https://www.flickr.com/photos/postmanpetecoluk/)

The Song Thrush was once a common bird but had sadly declined over the past years. It is now a rare visitor to the garden. when I started bird watching back in the 70’s it would be on almost every day’s bird list, but now to see, or hear one, is rare.

Song Thrush
Photo by Pete Beard (https://www.flickr.com/photos/postmanpetecoluk/)