Archive for the ‘Trains’ Category

LSWR M7 No 245

Posted: December 10, 2018 in History, Trains
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The M7 class locomotive came into service in 1897 and was primarily used on the London Network of the London and South Western Railway (LWSR). In all 105 engines were built between 1897 and 1911. In later years they became common on branch lines as other newer locomotives replaced them on suburban passenger services.

Loco 245 is one of the original 1897 batch. It was withdrawn from service in 1962.

The M7’s were withdrawn from service starting in 1957 and by 1964 there were no more running on network lines. Two survive in preservation No 245, which is in the National Railway Collection and No 53 on the Swanage Railway.

A fistful of A4

Posted: November 30, 2018 in Trains
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Any regular reader will not be surprised that before very long in my look back to my early days on the blog, I would start waxing lyrical about Gresley A4’s. Well, they are the best steam locomotives ever built! This collection of action shoots was first posted in April 2013. Was it really 5 years ago that all 5 remaining A4’s were together at York? Time flies.

A collection of A4 tweets. Will be wonderful to see 5 together at NRM York later in the year

Gladstone

Posted: November 26, 2018 in History, Trains
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Gladstone was built at Brighton works in 1882 and saw service on the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway until 1927. It is the last surviving engine of its type with the driving wheels at the front of the locomotive. It was designed to haul express trains on the London to Brighton line. 

When it finished service it was purchased by the Stephenson Locomotive Society and was exhibited at the LNER museum at York. In 1959 it was given to the British Transport Commission as part of the national collection and is now on display at the National Railway Museum in York. 

Class 08 064

Posted: November 19, 2018 in History, Trains
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Class 08 locomotives were a common sight on UK railways being the standard shunter engine of their time. They now form the most commonly preserved class of locomotive due to their great functionality as a shunter for moving other stock around yards. They were produced between 1953 and 1962 and in total, almost 1000 engines were produced. It was estimated in 2011, 50 years after the last one was built, that over 100 class 08 engines were still in active service on industrial or national rail sites across the country plus many more on heritage lines.

BR 1037 (D3079;08064) was built at Darlington in 1953 and now forms part of the National Railway Collection at York, alongside its sister locomotive 08911, an example of an engine modified by reducing the height of the bodywork for use on the Burry Port and Gwendraeth Railway in South Wales.

Agecroft No1

Posted: November 12, 2018 in Trains, Transport, UK, York
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Agecroft No 1 was one of three locomotives built in 1948 in Newcastle to shunt wagons at Agecroft Power Station. It remained in service until 1980 when it passed into private ownership. It was bought by the Science Museum at Manchester in 2009 and is now at the National railway Museum in York.

On the day I visited it was hauling a brake van, giving rides to visitors.

So often we concentrate on the big passenger express locomotives but there were hundreds, if not thousands, of engines, like Agecroft that drove our industry during the steam era and are part of that history.

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Class 47 – ‘Prince William’ – 2004. Science Museum Group Collection © The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Class 47 No798 was built at Crewe and entered into service in 1965 and was employed on a wide variety of duties including heavy freight and express passenger services. It regularly pulled the Royal Train during its working life. It was originally without a name until August 1985 when it was named ‘Firefly’. It was renamed ‘Prince William’ in 1995. It was presented by its owners EWS Railways to the Science Museum collection when it was withdrawn from service.

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47798 ‘Prince William’ at National Railway Museum, York

No trip to York is complete, at least for me, without a visit to the National Railway Museum.

My first stop this time was the South Yard where 60103 Flying Scotsman was parked up in between trips on the mainline. Unfortunately, it was parked around a corner of a building so it wasn’t accessible for good photographs.

Next stop was the Station Hall which as its name suggests is set out like a large station with trains in bay platforms, enabling you to walk alongside them.

At the moment it is hosting a display of Royal Train carriages from different periods of history.

In the Grand Hall, there is a display on Express trains featuring the Eurostar (which runs between London, Paris and Amsterdam) and the Japanese Bullet train, the Shinkansen.

It is now over 50 years since steam was phased out on UK railways and so aside from the steam locomotives more diesel and electric locomotives are being added to the national collection for preservation.

But finally, no visit would be complete without a stop at my favourite class of locomotive, the Gresley A4 Pacifics, here represented by 4468 Mallard. Last time I was here was to see all 5 of the worlds remaining A4s together to celebrate Mallard’s record-breaking run.

Black Prince is one of my favourite stem locomotives, so here are some more photos of this magnificent Engine on the North Norfolk Railway.

 

The story of Black Prince can be seen at:   https://petesfavouritethings.blog/2017/09/27/norfolk-journey-black-prince/

 

A very wet and windy day, so Sue and I forsake the outdoors for a trip on the North Norfolk Railway and lunch in Sheringham.

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We board our train, pulled by the magnificent Black Prince at Holt and make our way across the Norfolk countryside to the coastal town of Sheringham.

 


After lunch in Sheringham, we wander around the town centre admiring the shop front displays on a 1940’s theme as part of the town’s 1940’s weekend the following Saturday and Sunday. The charity and clothes shops have 1940’s clothes, the wool shop 1940’s pattern and materials and the electrical appliances shop has old fridges and electrical equipment. Amazing the lengths they have gone to and we were told that everybody dresses up in 1940s costume over the weekend.

But soon the train is calling for the return journey to Holt and once again we find ourselves travelling behind ‘Black Prince’ enjoying the sight and sounds of this wonderful engine.

 

York Railway Station

Posted: September 14, 2018 in History, Trains, UK, York
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York has one of the busiest Railway interchanges in the country with trains to all parts of England, Scotland and Wales

Video by Michael Jiroch (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IQksZSC6YIc)