Archive for the ‘Trains’ Category

On Saturday Sue and I, together with two friends Andrew and James, visited the Nene Valley Railway near Peterborough.This line is interesting as unlike most preserved railways it was not closed down as part of the cuts to the network in the 1960’s, but had actually closed to regular traffic in the late 1930’s.

Wansford Station

 

Wansford Station

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unfortunately, we found on arrival that our steam train scheduled for the day had failed and so we would be diesel hauled on our trip. The line runs from Yarwell into Peterborough through the Cambridgeshire countryside.

Class 31 diesel engine. Built for BR at Loughborough in 1961 and used in the Midland Region. It was withdrawn from mainline service in 2000.

34081 92 Squadron in the yard – A Bulleid ‘Battle of Britain Class locomotive. Built at Brighton in 1948, it worked on Southern Region until 1964, when it was sent to Woodhams in Barry. It was purchased by a group set up to preserve a ‘Battle of Britain class locomotive and overhauled at Wansford. It returned to steam in 1998. It is named after a Spitfire squadron based at Biggin Hill during the Battle of Britain

We did get to see some of the other engines in the yard and some of the other exhibits of Railway memorabilia.

Thomas the Tank Engine – An 0-6-0T built in 1947 and used at the British Sugar factory in nearby Peterborough. Arrived at Nene Valley in 1973

Swedish Railcar 1212

DL83 -built in 1967 it operated first at Corby Quarry before in 1971 being transferred to the Lillie Bridge depot of London Transport where it continued to work until its withdrawal in 1989

Signal Box at Wansford

Travelling Post Office

Turntable at Wansford. Originally from Peterborough East and installed here in 1997

 

This was a new Museum that I hadn’t heard of before, so I had to look it up. It is in Coventry so will have to add it to my list and visit if I am in that area

Model Railway Musings by D827 Kelly

On the weekend of 8th/9th July 2017, the Electric Railway Museum opened it’s doors to the public once again.

Natalie and myself visited on the Sunday (9th), with the aim to take photographs of the Bulleid design 4SUB unit and the Class 457 car (67300), as well as to take photos for a modeller working on a scratch built Bulleid design 2EPB.

There are around 40 vehicles at the museum, and some were unfortuately inaccessible (the highspeed freight vehicle (HSFV1) and the APT-P power car (obscured by a bus!)).

The museum holds the following items of stock:

Complete units:
  • 2EPB / 416/2 unit 6307 – Bulleid design
  • 2HAP / 414 unit
  • 2EPB / 416 unit 930053 – Former Tyneside EPB
  • 4SUB / 405 / 4732 – Bulleid design
  • 503 – LMS design 3rd rail unit
  • 501 unit number 501183/501188
  • AM9 / 309 unit number 960101 (309 624)
  • AM9 / 309…

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Flying Scotsman in Steam

Posted: June 8, 2017 in Trains, UK
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A great video of 60103 A3 Pacific ‘Flying Scotsman’ in steam

Video by Marsh Steam Videos and made available through Youtube

Bluebell Railway 2017

Posted: April 26, 2017 in Sussex, Trains, UK
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73082 Camelot approaching East Grinstead

Although the main reason for visiting the Bluebell Railway was to photograph Flying Scotsman, a number of other locomotives were also in steam on that day.

73082 at Horsted Keynes

30541 at Horsted Keynes

647 approaching Horsted Keynes

263 in the loco yard at Sheffield Park

60103 ‘Flying Scotsman’ is probably one of the most famous and iconic heritage steam engines in the UK and this past Bank Holiday weekend it has come south from its home at York to run on the Bluebell Railway in Sussex.

 

60103 at East Grinstead

Built as LNER4472, an A1 Pacific class locomotive at Doncaster, it entered into service in February 1923. It didn’t receive a name until the following year when it was part of the British Empire exhibition when it was decided to name it after the daily express train from London Kings Cross to Edinburgh ‘The Flying Scotsman’. It 1924 it became the first locomotive to officially be recorded as reaching 100mph and it headed the first non-stop run between London and Edinburgh in May 1928.

Model of 4472 as originally built

In the 1940s the A1 class was rebuilt and remodelled into the new design A3 Pacifics and 4472 underwent this process in 1947 and was renumbered the following year as 60103 following the nationalisation of the railways.

60103 preparing to leave East Grinstead with southbound service.

60103 approaches Horsted Keynes at head of northbound service

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It hauled its last passenger train on 14th January 1963 between Kings Cross and Leeds. It was bought by Alan Pegler, who put it to work running charter trains. In 1967 it visited the USA as part of a tour to promote British goods and services and was very successful. However, an attempt to repeat this in 1969, saw the company go into bankruptcy and 60103 was seized by American creditors.

60103 at Sheffield Park

A rescue operation was put together and new owners purchased the engine and it arrived back in the UK in February 1972. It split its time between mainline charters and work on the now growing number of heritage railways. In 1988 it visited Australia and set the record for the longest ever non-stop run for a steam locomotive (Alice Springs to Perth). Returning the opposite way to which it went out it became the first, and possibly the only, Steam locomotive to have circumnavigated the world.

60103 at Sheffield Park

In 1993 it became necessary to restrict its running to heritage lines and two years later it was withdrawn from service. it returned to running in 1999 and continued to run until 2004 when it was bought by the National Railway Museum, who embarked on a 10-year refurbishment programme. 60103 returned to steam in February 2014.

75014 Braveheart is a BR Standard 4 built at Swindon in 1951. It worked in the Midlands and was withdrawn in 1966 and sent to Barry scrapyard. It was purchased in 1981 and transferred to the North York Moors Railway where it returned to steam in 1994. In 2002 it was sold to the Dartmouth Steam Railway where it returned to steam in 2016.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some more pictures from our trip on the Dartmouth Steam Railway

Running alongside the River Dart

Running alongside the River Dart

Approaching Kingswear

Approaching Kingswear

Kingswear Staion

Kingswear Station

Dartmouth Station, where no train ever called. Now a quayside cafe.

Dartmouth Station, where no train ever called. Now a quayside cafe.

Dartmouth Station

Dartmouth Station

Signal box at Kingswear

Signal box at Kingswear

75014 Braveheart entering Kingswear Station

75014 Braveheart entering Kingswear Station

Our journey on the Dartmouth Steam Railway starts at Paignton Station.

Paignton Staion

Paignton Staion

The line between Torquay and Kingswear was opened in 1864 and amalgamated into the Great Western Railway in 1876. The line was closed in 1967  and was sold in 1972 to a private heritage company and the first trains ran the following year.

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75014 Braveheart at Paignton Staion

75014 Braveheart at Paignton Staion

Heading out from Paignton we pass Goodrington Bay

Goodrington Bay

Goodrington Bay

As we travel south we cross the viaducts over Broadsands Bay before arriving in Churston, where passengers for Brixham alight to continue their journey by road.

75014 approaching Broadsands Viaduct

75014 approaching Broadsands Viaduct

75014 crossing the Broadsands Viaduct

75014 crossing the Broadsands Viaduct

Turning inland we pass through the long Greenway tunnel before emerging beside the River Dart alongside which we pass before arriving at a stop for Greenway, the former home of Agatha Christie, now open to the public.

Entering Greenway Tunnel

Entering Greenway Tunnel

Emerging beside the River Dart

Emerging beside the River Dart      

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Continuing alongside the river we arrive in Kingswear, from where we can catch a ferry across to Dartmouth. Originally the railway had intended to cross the river and terminate at Dartmouth. However they were to be frustrated in finding a place to cross the river and although the station was built it was never served by trains. It is now a cafe.

Kingswear Station

Kingswear Station

The station building from Dartmouth Station

The station building from Dartmouth Station

 

 

 

This is one impressive project as enthusiasts seek to fill the gaps in our national collection of preserved locomotives.

New Build Steam

David Bradshaw and Gavin Shell of the Patriot project kindly answered some questions about 5551 The Unknown Warrior.

CAD image highlighting the snifting valve. By Kevin West.

When did project start, and how? How did a new-build Patriot come to be the National Memorial Engine?
Back in 2007 when Tornado was nearing completion David Bradshaw, joint founder of the GW Society County Project was daring to dream about new possibilities in railway preservation. One of his biggest regrets was that a LMS Patriot class was never saved for the National Collection despite one being a memorial engine. Knowing what it takes to launch a project David along with editor Danny Hopkins and former editor Tony Streeter of Steam Railway magazine wrote an article asking if there was enough support to launch the project. At the time there was no other LMS new build on the cards with all the other…

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A Busy Day at the Bure Valley Railway

Posted: December 1, 2016 in Trains

Its a long time since I visited this railway. We have planned our holiday in Norfolk next year so maybe there will be an opportunity then

Steve's 009 and 09 Adventure

Mark Timothy at Aylsham

Recently, I joined the Norfolk and Suffolk Narrow Gauge Modellers for a day out on the Bure Valley Railway. It was a busy and enjoyable day.

First, we went for a ride on the railway. In the picture above No. 9 ‘Mark Timothy’ is waiting to leave Aylsham station. We spent the whole journey to Wroxham having a good natter about all aspects of narrow gauge trains, which was great fun.

At Wroxham the driver and fireman turned Mark Timothy on the turntable and we all took photos.

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Rebuilt to resemble a Kitson from the Leek and Manifold Railway she’s a really good looking loco. 003

Ready for the return journey.

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Following an excellent ‘sausage, chips and beans’ in the Whistlestop Café at Aylsham station we got the chance to tour the workshops. Who could resist…

Andrew Barnes, the Managing Director of the BVR, conducted the tour. Here’s an overall…

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