Archive for the ‘Trains’ Category

National Railway Museum

Posted: August 16, 2018 in Trains, UK, York
Tags: ,

Video by Michael Jiroch (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45GI8ifbXBs)

(first posted in March 2013)

The Duchess of Hamilton was built as one of 10 streamliners for the London Midland and Scottish railway and entered into service in 1938

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In 1939 it went to USA for the New York World Fair. In 1947 the streamlining was removed (as shown in picture above). It continued in service until 1960 when it was bought as an exhibit for Butlins holiday camp in Minehead. It remained at the camp until 1975 when it went on loan to the National Railway Museum in York. It was refurbished to mainline running condition and spent time either on static display or on excursions.

Duchess of Hamilton in action

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QVFCiydrAus

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xCk5SJIH0lw

In 2005 it was decided to reinstate the original streamlining and the Duchess went back on display in 2009 with her streamlining restored.

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Mallard – One of my favourite steam Locomotives

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For more information see

http://www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LNER_Class_A4_4468_Mallard

To see Mallard in action

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UvlFeE38WN0
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KYalIj-nd4Y
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B_ou420qBMs

Reposting this post connected to Edith Cavell which I originally published last year

Van 132, known as the Cavell Van was built in 1919 as a luggage van to run on passenger services on the Chatham and South-Eastern Railway. Within a few weeks of service, it was selected to convey the body of Edith Cavell, a nurse who was working in Brussels at the outbreak of World War I. When the Germans captured Brussels Cavell and a few colleagues were allowed to remain. She became involved in the underground resistance and played an important part in the escape network for British servicemen trapped in Belgium. She was arrested in August 1915 and tried by a German military court. She and 4 others were executed by firing squad on October 12th. In 1919 it was decided that her body should be brought back to the UK and buried in Norwich Cathedral and van 132 played its part by carrying her coffin from Dover to Victoria on 13th-14th May and the newspapers reported that every station along the route was packed with people wanting to pay their respects.

Van 132 was used again on the 4th July for the repatriation of Captain Charles Fryatt, who was master of a merchant ship, who in 1915 was ordered to stop by a German U-Boat. Fryatt refused and attempted to ram the U-boat, which just managed to dive in time. He was captured a year later whilst trying to evacuate refugees from Holland. In July 1916 he was tried for piracy and executed by firing squad. This caused general condemnation not only from the allied nations but also from many neutral countries. His coffin was conveyed across the Channel to Dover and thence by train to Charing Cross on route to Dovercourt in Essex where he was reburied.

Van 132 was to be used again in November 1920 when it was used to carry the body of the ‘unknown warrior’. An unidentified body had been chosen and the coffin bearing the inscription ‘A British Warrior who fell in the Great War of 1914-1918’ was conveyed from Boulogne to Dover, where it was placed into van 132 for the journey to Victoria. The next day it was taken to Westminster Abbey for the burial service in a new memorial to remember all those who had fallen during the war.

 

Van 132 is on permanent display at the Kent and East Sussex Railway

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A weekend visit to the steam gala at the Epping and Ongar Railway. Although this is the nearest Steam Railway to London this is my first visit. The line is situated on the extension of the London Underground line from Epping (its current terminus) to Ongar.

 

At present, although the line is still in place visitors have to catch a bus from Epping Station to North Weald.

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North Weald is currently one of two stations currently open on the line.

The journey from North Weald to Ongar through the Essex countryside was pulled by 813, a GWR Saddle Tank.

The end of the line is at Ongar Station.

 

The Journey back to North Weald was pulled by US Army Transportation Company S160 5197

In all, there were 5 locomotives in steam – the others being Hunslett Austerity ‘Lord Phil’, Metropolitan No 1 and Isobel.

An excellent day.

 

 

Originally posted in July 2013

Was great to be back at Didcot Railway Centre to see 6023 King Edward II in steam.

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6023 was a king-class heavy express steam locomotive specifically designed for taking express trains over the steep gradients found on Great Western routes in south-west England. 6023 came into service in June 1930 and spent most which working life based at depots in the South West before transferring to Old Oak Common in London in August of 1956, where it worked on the London – Wolverhampton route. In September of 1960 it transferred to Canton depot in Cardiff and until its withdrawal in June 1962 working trains between London and Cardiff.

Most of the King class locos disappeared quickly after they were withdrawn from service. However, 6023 together with 6024 were kept to perform deadweight testing on bridges and subsequently sent to Woodhams in Barry, where, like many locomotives they were left to decay. In fact, 6023 stayed at Barry until 1982 when it was purchased and moved first to Brighton and then to Bristol for restoration. Unfortunately before this work could be completed the funds ran out in 1988. The locomotive was then purchased by the Great Western Society, and arrived at Didcot in March 1990, where restoration recommenced. The locomotive was finally first steamed in public at Didcot in April 2011.

Brilliant to see her in full steam, although I have to say I’m not a great fan of the blue livery, although I’m told this is authentic BR livery from the 1950s. Call me traditional but I’d much rather see her in GWR green or BR green or black. perhaps blue engines remind me too much of Thomas the Tank Engine (Not that I have anything against Thomas, you understand)

Some more pictures of 4464 Bittern at the Mid-Hants Railway spring gala

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It was fitting that 4464 Bittern should return to Mid-Hants railway since she was restored to mainline order at Ropley works.

4464 Bittern at Alton

4464 Bittern at Alton

4464 was built at Doncaster works in 1937, a sister to engine to the famous ‘Mallard’. In all 35 A4 pacific’s were built and of these 6 remain in preservation. Bittern now carries a plaque commemorating her part in the celebrations of the 75th anniversary of Mallard’s steam speed record.

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4464 was initially based at Newcastle and was responsible for hauling the Flying Scotsman express between London and Newcastle. After the second world war she pulled the Talisman express from Kings Cross to Edinburgh. The A4s were replaced on these services by diesel locomotives in 1963 and 4464 went to Aberdeen to pull express services between there and Edinburgh or Glasgow. However 3 years later they were withdrawn from service.

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4464 was purchased by a private owner and ran railtours but she quickly developed a cracked frame and had to be withdrawn from service and it was not until 2000 that work began at Ropley works to bring her back to running specification.She returned to service in 2007 and in 2013 she undertook 3 90mph runs as part of the celebrations of the 75th anniversary of Mallard’s record of 126mph in 1938 (as commemorated on her new plaque). Bittern made a top speed of 93mph.

When Keith and I were in Norfolk recently we didn’t ride on the North Norfolk Railway but we did pop into Sheringham Station on a couple of occasions to use the excellent tea room.

BR Standard 76084 was present on both our visits.

76084 left the Horwich Works in March 1957. It was one of the last batch of locomotives to be built at Horwich. Records show that 76084 initially went to Lower Darwen shed near Blackburn along with 76080/1/2 and 3.

All 5 locomotives were transferred to Sutton Oak, St.Helens in preparation for the closure of the Lower Darwen shed in March 1965 and scrapping of the class began the following year. 76084 was the last of her class to be withdrawn from BR stock in December 1967. 76084 arrived at Barry in a convoy with 76077, 76079 and 76080. She was to stand in the sidings at Barry until 1982 when she was purchased and the new owner had the engine and tender transferred to his back garden where he began work on it. After his death in 1990, the engine was sold again and taken to Morpeth. The new owners continued with the restoration work and 76084 was finally returned to steam in May 2013. By now the Engine had been transferred to the North Norfolk Railway.

 

92203 was built in Swindon in 1959 and spent its entire time in service hauling Iron Ore trains from Bidston Duck Birkenhead to Shotton Steelworks. It was withdrawn from service it was purchased by the artist David Shepherd. He named it Black Prince. It has been in service at the Longmoor Military Railway, East Somerset Railway, Gloucestershire and Warwickshire Railway before coming to the North Norfolk Railway in 2011, re-entering service in 2014. In 2015 it was purchased by the North Norfolk Railway.