Posts Tagged ‘National Railway Museum’

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Class 47 – ‘Prince William’ – 2004. Science Museum Group Collection © The Board of Trustees of the Science Museum

Class 47 No798 was built at Crewe and entered into service in 1965 and was employed on a wide variety of duties including heavy freight and express passenger services. It regularly pulled the Royal Train during its working life. It was originally without a name until August 1985 when it was named ‘Firefly’. It was renamed ‘Prince William’ in 1995. It was presented by its owners EWS Railways to the Science Museum collection when it was withdrawn from service.

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47798 ‘Prince William’ at National Railway Museum, York

No trip to York is complete, at least for me, without a visit to the National Railway Museum.

My first stop this time was the South Yard where 60103 Flying Scotsman was parked up in between trips on the mainline. Unfortunately, it was parked around a corner of a building so it wasn’t accessible for good photographs.

Next stop was the Station Hall which as its name suggests is set out like a large station with trains in bay platforms, enabling you to walk alongside them.

At the moment it is hosting a display of Royal Train carriages from different periods of history.

In the Grand Hall, there is a display on Express trains featuring the Eurostar (which runs between London, Paris and Amsterdam) and the Japanese Bullet train, the Shinkansen.

It is now over 50 years since steam was phased out on UK railways and so aside from the steam locomotives more diesel and electric locomotives are being added to the national collection for preservation.

But finally, no visit would be complete without a stop at my favourite class of locomotive, the Gresley A4 Pacifics, here represented by 4468 Mallard. Last time I was here was to see all 5 of the worlds remaining A4s together to celebrate Mallard’s record-breaking run.

Completed in 1937 this was the 100th Gresley designed Pacific locomotive to be built. It worked its life on the East Coast mainline and holds the post war steam speed record of 112 mph set on 23/5/1959. This was achieved over the same stretch of track the Mallard had used for the world record run pre-war, but the difference was that 4498 was pulling a full passenger train. It was withdrawn from service in February 1966 and sent to Crewe for refurbishment as it had been purchased by a preservation trust. Following this it was used to run railtours out of Steamtown at Carnforth. In 1994 it transfered to Great Central Railway and also did a spell at the East Lancs Railway before being based on the North York Moors railway. In 2012 it took part in the Olympic torch tour of the UK.

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video by Grantham8 (http://www.youtube.com/user/grantham8?feature=watch)


video by steamvideo (http://www.youtube.com/user/steamvideo?feature=watch)

National Railway Museum

Posted: August 16, 2018 in Trains, UK, York
Tags: ,

Video by Michael Jiroch (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45GI8ifbXBs)

(first posted in March 2013)

The Duchess of Hamilton was built as one of 10 streamliners for the London Midland and Scottish railway and entered into service in 1938

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In 1939 it went to USA for the New York World Fair. In 1947 the streamlining was removed (as shown in picture above). It continued in service until 1960 when it was bought as an exhibit for Butlins holiday camp in Minehead. It remained at the camp until 1975 when it went on loan to the National Railway Museum in York. It was refurbished to mainline running condition and spent time either on static display or on excursions.

Duchess of Hamilton in action

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QVFCiydrAus

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xCk5SJIH0lw

In 2005 it was decided to reinstate the original streamlining and the Duchess went back on display in 2009 with her streamlining restored.

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Mallard – One of my favourite steam Locomotives

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For more information see

http://www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LNER_Class_A4_4468_Mallard

To see Mallard in action

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UvlFeE38WN0
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KYalIj-nd4Y
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B_ou420qBMs

More space to display even more of the Museums collection. What could be better!

Loco Yard

York Railway Station Queen Street 2013

The City of York Council working with Network Rail, the National Railway Museum and the Homes and Communities Agency have created a “new vision” for York.  The scheme includes various improvements of how the railway station is accessed from the city centre and the redevelopment of the city’s largest (178 acre) brownfield site located behind York Central railway station.  The proposed development would see 2,500 new homes, 120,000 square metres of office space creating 7,000 new jobs and of particular interest to this blog – more space to expand and improve the world’s largest railway museum!

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City of Truro was a class 4-4-0 engine built for the GWR. It left Swindon works in 1903 and worked a variety of different duties. It was one of the first locomotives to reach 100mph, when in May 1904 it was timed at 8.8 seconds between quarter mile posts – this equates to a speed of 102.3 mph.

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It was withdrawn from service in 1931 and was surprisingly sent to the LNER museum at York for preservation (The GWR seemingly uninterested in preserving this historic locomotive). In a bizarre turn about it was renovated in 1957 and return to BR usage for pulling excursion trains and also operating some timetabled services. It was withdrawn for a second time in 1961. It went first to the GWR museum at Swindon and then in 1984 to the NRM at York. In 2004 it was overhauled and returned to working order and spent 7 years primarily on the Gloucester and Warwickshire Railway before returning to NRM in 2011.


3717 at LLangollen Railway Gala 2010
video by danlefou (http://www.youtube.com/user/danlefou?feature=watch)

D4-4-0 number 737 was built at Ashford for the London Chatham and Dover Railway. It entered into service in 1901 and was used on the fast express passenger services between London and Dover. It was withdrawn from service in 1951 and was subsequently restored and is part of the National Railway museum collection.

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It is reckoned by some to be one of the most handsome engines ever produced

4496 was built in 1937 and was originally destined to be called Sparrowhawk. However, when it left the works, it was named Golden Shuttle in recognition of the Yorkshire wool industry. Its initial use was on the route between London and Leeds and between London and Bradford. In 1946 the locomotive was transferred to the East Coast mainline and renamed Dwight D. Eisenhower, after the American wartime commander (later to be President of the United States). The locomotive was withdrawn from service in July 1963, taken to Doncaster works for refurbishment and then shipped to United States of America where it went on display at the National Railroad Museum in Green Bay, Wisconsin. In September 2012, it traveled Halifax Nova Scotia where along with the ‘Dominion of Canada’ it was shipped to the UK for participation in the Mallard 75 celebrations. It will return to the USA in spring 2014.

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